Plant Growth Regulation

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 89–91

Benzoic acid induces tolerance to biotic stress caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi in Banksia attenuata

Authors

  • Mia Williams
    • Department of Soil Science and Plant NutritionUniversity of Western Australia
  • Tissa Senaratna
    • Department of Soil Science and Plant NutritionUniversity of Western Australia
    • Botanic Gardens and Parks AuthorityPlant Science Research Laboratory
  • Kingsley Dixon
    • Botanic Gardens and Parks AuthorityPlant Science Research Laboratory
  • Krishnapillai Sivasithamparam
    • Department of Soil Science and Plant NutritionUniversity of Western Australia
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1027355604096

Cite this article as:
Williams, M., Senaratna, T., Dixon, K. et al. Plant Growth Regulation (2003) 41: 89. doi:10.1023/A:1027355604096

Abstract

Banksia attenuata plants were treated with soil drenches or foliar sprays of benzoic acid (BZA) to determine induced resistance to Phytophthora cinnamomi. Stems of B. attenuata were inoculated with the pathogen 1 week after treatment with BZA. Resistance was estimated by measuring P. cinnamomi lesions on stems. Treatment with 0.10 mM, 0.25 mM or 0.50 mM BZA caused a reduction in lesion size with 0.50 mM BZA applied as a soil drench being the most effective treatment at suppressing the development of lesions. This is the first report of BZA induced host resistance in any plant species to any pathogen.

Acquired resistanceBanksia attenuataBenzoic acidPhytophthora cinnamomiSalicylic acid

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003