Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 28, Issue 6, pp 467–478

Attentional Capacities in Children with Autism: Is There a General Deficit in Shifting Focus?

  • Daisy M. Pascualvaca
  • Bryan D. Fantie
  • Maria Papageorgiou
  • Allan F. Mirsky
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1026091809650

Cite this article as:
Pascualvaca, D.M., Fantie, B.D., Papageorgiou, M. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (1998) 28: 467. doi:10.1023/A:1026091809650

Abstract

Twenty-three children with autism and two control groups completed an attention battery comprising three versions of the continuous performance test (CPT), a digit cancellation task, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), and two novel, computerized tests of shifting attention (i.e., the Same–Different Computerized Task and the Computerized Matching Task). Children with autism could focus on a particular stimulus and sustain this focus as indicated by their performance on the digit cancellation task and the CPT. Their performance on the WCST suggested problems in some aspects of shifting attention (i.e., disengaging attention). The autism group performed as well as controls on the Same–Different Computerized Task, however, that required successive comparisons between stimuli. This implies that they could, in fact, shift their attention continuously. In addition, they did not differ from controls on the Computerized Matching Task, an analog of the WCST, suggesting that they do not have a general deficit in shifting attention.

Attention deficit autism shifting focus 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daisy M. Pascualvaca
    • 1
  • Bryan D. Fantie
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maria Papageorgiou
    • 1
  • Allan F. Mirsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Section on Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Laboratory of Brain and CognitionNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesda
  2. 2.Human Neuropsychology Laboratory, Department of PsychologyThe American UniversityWashington, DC

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