Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment

, Volume 25, Issue 4, pp 251–256

Depression and Anxiety: Integrating the Tripartite and Cognitive Content-Specificity Assessment Models

Authors

  • Richard Beck
    • Department of PsychologyAbilene Christian University
  • Bradley Benedict
    • Department of PsychologyAbilene Christian University
  • Angie Winkler
    • Department of PsychologyAbilene Christian University
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1025899029040

Cite this article as:
Beck, R., Benedict, B. & Winkler, A. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment (2003) 25: 251. doi:10.1023/A:1025899029040

Abstract

The cognitive content-specificity hypothesis proposes that depression and anxiety can be discriminated on the basis of unique cognitive profiles. Alternatively, the Tripartite model suggests that, although depression and anxiety share a general distress factor, anhedonia is a characteristic of depression with anxious arousal a characteristic of anxiety. Past research devoted to integrating these two models has been limited in a number of ways. To remedy these limitations, this study attempted to assess the complete Tripartite model and used a multidimensional cognitive assessment tool to handle the heterogeneity of anxious cognitive content. Results on data collected from 411 clients seeking services at a university counseling center suggested that a one-to-one mapping between Tripartite dimensions and cognitive content was possible. Further, variables from each model simultaneously explained unique variance in depression and anxiety ratings.

depressionanxietycognitive content-specificitytripartite modelassessment

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003