Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 87–106

Self-Medication, Traumatic Reenactment, and Somatic Expression in Bulimic and Self-Mutilating Behavior

  • Sharon Klayman Farber
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1025785911606

Cite this article as:
Farber, S.K. Clinical Social Work Journal (1997) 25: 87. doi:10.1023/A:1025785911606

Abstract

A psychoanalytic framework provided direction for research on the association between binge-purging (bulimic) and self-mutilating behaviors, comparing them for similarities and differences. The similarities in the multiple functions and psychosomatic processes served by these behaviors are presented, as well as the phenomenon of symptom substitution. Both behaviors tend to be practiced by those with severe personality and dissociative disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder. Both serve ego-compensatory needs in the absence of the adequate ability to regulate and modulate emotions, moods, and tensions. They may serve as compensatory attempts to differentiate self and object, define and differentiate body boundaries, master severe childhood trauma by means of psychophysiological addictive reenactments, and to express emotion.

bulimia self-mutilation addiction trauma symptom substitution 

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon Klayman Farber

There are no affiliations available