Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 337–345

Structure and Function of the Vacuolar H+-ATPase: Moving from Low-Resolution Models to High-Resolution Structures

  • Michael Harrison
  • Lyndsey Durose
  • Chun Feng Song
  • Elizabeth Barratt
  • John Trinick
  • Richard Jones
  • John B. C. Findlay
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1025728915565

Cite this article as:
Harrison, M., Durose, L., Song, C.F. et al. J Bioenerg Biomembr (2003) 35: 337. doi:10.1023/A:1025728915565

Abstract

In the absence of a high-resolution structure for the vacuolar H+-ATPase, a number of approaches can yield valuable information about structure/function relationships in the enzyme. Electron microscopy can provide not only a representation of the overall architecture of the complex, but also a low-resolution map onto which structures solved for individually expressed subunits can be fitted. Here we review the possibilities for electron microscopy of the Saccharomyces V-ATPase and examine the suitability of V-ATPase subunits for expression in high yield prokaryotic systems, a key step towards high-resolution structural studies. We also review the role of experimentally-derived structural models in understanding structure/function relationships in the V-ATPase, with particular reference to the complex of proton-translocating 16 kDa proteolipids in the membrane domain of the V-ATPase. This model in turn makes testable predictions about the sites of binding of bafilomycins and the functional interactions between the proteolipid and the single-copy membrane subunit Vph1p, with implications for the constitution of the proton translocation pathway.

Vacuolar membrane V-ATPase expression circular dichroism electron microscopy modelling 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Harrison
    • 1
  • Lyndsey Durose
    • 1
  • Chun Feng Song
    • 2
  • Elizabeth Barratt
    • 1
  • John Trinick
    • 2
  • Richard Jones
    • 2
  • John B. C. Findlay
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyUniversity of LeedsLeedsUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.School of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of LeedsLeedsUnited Kingdom

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