Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 68, Issue 4, pp 343–359

Attention and Clinical Symptoms in Schizophrenia

  • Barbara Cornblatt
  • Michael Obuchowski
  • David B. Schnur
  • John D. O'Brien
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1025495030997

Cite this article as:
Cornblatt, B., Obuchowski, M., Schnur, D.B. et al. Psychiatr Q (1997) 68: 343. doi:10.1023/A:1025495030997

Abstract

Attentional deficits, long established to characterize patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, have traditionally been regarded as part of the disorder's clinical syndrome. In this paper we provide evidence to indicate that: a) impaired attention is a dimension of schizophrenia that is independent of clinical state, and b) that attention does not appear to respond to the medication (i.e. standard neuroleptics) most typically used to treat clinical symptoms. Since intact attention and other cognitive processes appear critical to successful functioning in the community after hospital discharge, these findings have major implications for treatment.

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Cornblatt
    • 1
  • Michael Obuchowski
    • 2
  • David B. Schnur
    • 4
    • 5
  • John D. O'Brien
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry Research, Hillside HospitalLong Island Jewish Medical CenterGlen Oaks
  2. 2.Psychophysiology Unit, Department of Psychiatry Research, Hillside HospitalLong Island Jewish Medical CenterGlen Oaks
  3. 3.Dept. of Psychiatry ResearchHillside Hospital, LIJMCGlen Oaks
  4. 4.Mount Sinai School of MedicineNew York
  5. 5.Elmhurst Hospital CenterElmhurst