Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 29, Issue 8, pp 1757–1770

Isolation, Characterization, and Quantitative Analysis of Microviridin J, a New Microcystis Metabolite Toxic to Daphnia

  • Thomas Rohrlack
  • Kirsten Christoffersen
  • Poul Erik Hansen
  • Wei Zhang
  • Olaf Czarnecki
  • Manfred Henning
  • Jutta Fastner
  • Marcel Erhard
  • Brett A. Neilan
  • Melanie Kaebernick
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1024889925732

Cite this article as:
Rohrlack, T., Christoffersen, K., Hansen, P.E. et al. J Chem Ecol (2003) 29: 1757. doi:10.1023/A:1024889925732
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Abstract

This paper describes the purification and characterization of microviridin J, a newly discovered metabolite of Microcystis that causes a lethal molting disruption in Daphnia spp., upon ingestion of living cyanobacterial cells. Microviridin J consists of an acetylated chain of 13 amino acids arranged in three rings and two side chains. Unlike other known isoforms of microviridin, microviridin J contains arginine that imparts a unique solution conformation characterized by proximal hydrophobic interactions between Arg and other regions of the molecule. This eventually results in the formation and stabilization of an additional ring system. Microviridin J potently inhibits porcine trypsin, bovine chymotrypsin, and daphnid trypsin-like proteases. The activity against trypsin is most likely due to Arg and its distinctive conformational interactions. Overall, the data presented for microviridin J emphasize once again the ability of cyanobacteria to produce numerous and potent environmental toxins.

MicrocystiscyanobacteriaDaphniamicroviridinNMRmicrocystinenvironmental toxins

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Rohrlack
    • 1
  • Kirsten Christoffersen
    • 1
  • Poul Erik Hansen
    • 2
  • Wei Zhang
    • 2
  • Olaf Czarnecki
    • 3
  • Manfred Henning
    • 3
  • Jutta Fastner
    • 4
  • Marcel Erhard
    • 5
  • Brett A. Neilan
    • 6
  • Melanie Kaebernick
    • 7
  1. 1.Freshwater Biological LaboratoryUniversity of CopenhagenHillerødDenmark
  2. 2.Department of Life Sciences and ChemistryRoskilde UniversityRoskildeDenmark
  3. 3.Group Ecophysiology, Department of BiologyHumboldt-UniversityBerlinGermany
  4. 4.Biotechnology Center and Max Vollmer InstituteTechnical University BerlinBerlinGermany
  5. 5.AnagnosTec GmbH, Im Biotechnologiepark TGZ IILuckenwaldeGermany
  6. 6.School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  7. 7.Group Genetics, Department of BiologyHumboldt-UniversityBerlinGermany