Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 29, Issue 8, pp 1757–1770

Isolation, Characterization, and Quantitative Analysis of Microviridin J, a New Microcystis Metabolite Toxic to Daphnia

Authors

    • Freshwater Biological LaboratoryUniversity of Copenhagen
  • Kirsten Christoffersen
    • Freshwater Biological LaboratoryUniversity of Copenhagen
  • Poul Erik Hansen
    • Department of Life Sciences and ChemistryRoskilde University
  • Wei Zhang
    • Department of Life Sciences and ChemistryRoskilde University
  • Olaf Czarnecki
    • Group Ecophysiology, Department of BiologyHumboldt-University
  • Manfred Henning
    • Group Ecophysiology, Department of BiologyHumboldt-University
  • Jutta Fastner
    • Biotechnology Center and Max Vollmer InstituteTechnical University Berlin
  • Marcel Erhard
    • AnagnosTec GmbH, Im Biotechnologiepark TGZ II
  • Brett A. Neilan
    • School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular SciencesUniversity of New South Wales
  • Melanie Kaebernick
    • Group Genetics, Department of BiologyHumboldt-University
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1024889925732

Cite this article as:
Rohrlack, T., Christoffersen, K., Hansen, P.E. et al. J Chem Ecol (2003) 29: 1757. doi:10.1023/A:1024889925732

Abstract

This paper describes the purification and characterization of microviridin J, a newly discovered metabolite of Microcystis that causes a lethal molting disruption in Daphnia spp., upon ingestion of living cyanobacterial cells. Microviridin J consists of an acetylated chain of 13 amino acids arranged in three rings and two side chains. Unlike other known isoforms of microviridin, microviridin J contains arginine that imparts a unique solution conformation characterized by proximal hydrophobic interactions between Arg and other regions of the molecule. This eventually results in the formation and stabilization of an additional ring system. Microviridin J potently inhibits porcine trypsin, bovine chymotrypsin, and daphnid trypsin-like proteases. The activity against trypsin is most likely due to Arg and its distinctive conformational interactions. Overall, the data presented for microviridin J emphasize once again the ability of cyanobacteria to produce numerous and potent environmental toxins.

MicrocystiscyanobacteriaDaphniamicroviridinNMRmicrocystinenvironmental toxins

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003