Journal of Primary Prevention

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 319–339

NTU: An Africentric Approach to Substance Abuse Prevention Among African American Youth

  • Valerie R. Cherry
  • Faye Z. Belgrave
  • Willa Jones
  • Darryl Kofi Kennon
  • Famebridge S. Gray
  • Fred Phillips
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1024607028289

Cite this article as:
Cherry, V.R., Belgrave, F.Z., Jones, W. et al. The Journal of Primary Prevention (1998) 18: 319. doi:10.1023/A:1024607028289

Abstract

The primary goal of the NTU project was to reduce risk factors and increase protective factors for ATOD use among African American 5th and 6th graders. The objectives of the NTU program were: 1) to improve knowledge of and increase intolerance of drugs; 2) to improve values; 3) to increase racial identity; 4) to improve self-esteem; 5) to increase knowledge of African culture; 6) to improve family communications; 7) to improve behaviors in school; and 8) to improve problem solving skills. Africentric philosophy and world-view provided the conceptual framework for the development of intervention activities. Intervention components for 5th graders included a rites of passage program, a substance abuse education program, an Africentric education program, a parenting program, and a family therapy program. Sixth graders participated in a booster program designed to reinforce skills and values learned the previous year. Pre and post data were collected from 5th and 6th grade participants in an intervention and a comparison group. Measures of drug knowledge, Africentric values, self-esteem, racial identity, family communication, child behaviors, and problem solving were obtained. The results indicated significant program effects for protective factors including racial identity, knowledge of African culture, self-esteem, and school behaviors.

Africentric approach to substance abuse preventionprevention for African-American youth

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valerie R. Cherry
    • 1
  • Faye Z. Belgrave
    • 2
  • Willa Jones
    • 1
  • Darryl Kofi Kennon
    • 1
  • Famebridge S. Gray
    • 2
  • Fred Phillips
    • 1
  1. 1.Progressive Life CenterWashington, D.C
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyGeorge Washington UniversityWashington, D.C