Journal of Neurocytology

, Volume 31, Issue 2, pp 161–174

Heat shock protein 70 and heat shock protein 90 expression in light- and dark-adapted adult octopus retinas

  • Gina H. Ochoa
  • Ying Mei Clark
  • Brian Matsumoto
  • Jose A. Torres-Ruiz
  • Laura J. Robles
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1023949707669

Cite this article as:
Ochoa, G.H., Clark, Y.M., Matsumoto, B. et al. J Neurocytol (2002) 31: 161. doi:10.1023/A:1023949707669

Abstract

Light- and dark-adaptation leads to changes in rhabdom morphology and photopigment distribution in the octopus retina. Molecular chaperones, including heat shock proteins (Hsps), may be involved in specific signaling pathways that cause changes in photoreceptor actin- and tubulin-based cytoskeletons and movement of the photopigments, rhodopsin and retinochrome. In this study, we used immunoblotting, in situ RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy to localize the inducible form of Hsp70 and the larger Hsp90 in light- and dark-adapted and dorsal and ventral halves of adult octopus retinas. The Hsps showed differences in distribution between the light and dark and in dorsal vs. ventral position in the retina. Double labeling confocal microscopy co-localized Hsp70 with actin and tubulin, and Hsp90 with the photopigment, retinochrome. Our results demonstrate the presence of Hsp70 and Hsp90 in otherwise non-stressed light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas. These Hsps may help stabilize the cytoskeleton, important for rhabdom structure, and are perhaps involved in the redistribution of retinochrome in conditions of light and dark.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gina H. Ochoa
    • 1
  • Ying Mei Clark
    • 1
  • Brian Matsumoto
    • 2
  • Jose A. Torres-Ruiz
    • 3
  • Laura J. Robles
    • 1
  1. 1.Biology DepartmentCalifornia State UniversityCarsonUSA
  2. 2.Neuroscience InstituteUniversity of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA
  3. 3.Ponce School of MedicinePoncePuerto Rico

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