Euphytica

, Volume 131, Issue 1, pp 37–45

Comparisons of genetic and morphological distance with heterosis between Medicago sativa subsp. sativa and subsp. falcata

  • Heathcliffe Riday
  • E. Charles Brummer
  • T. Austin Campbell
  • Diane Luth
  • Patricia M. Cazcarro
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1023050126901

Cite this article as:
Riday, H., Brummer, E.C., Campbell, T.A. et al. Euphytica (2003) 131: 37. doi:10.1023/A:1023050126901

Abstract

Biomass yield heterosis has been shown to exist between Medicago sativasubsp. sativa and Medica gosativa subsp. falcata. The objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of what morphological and genetic factors were most highly correlated with total biomass yield heterosis. We calculated genetic distances among nine sativa and five falcate genotypes based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) DNA markers. Genetic distance did not correlate with specific combining ability (SCA) or mid-parent heterosis. In contrast, a morphological distance matrix based on seventeen agronomic and forage quality traits was significantly correlated with heterosis; the agronomic traits of maturity, midseason regrowth, and autumn regrowth showed strong association with heterosis. Heterosis was also correlated with subspecies. We suggest that in many cases progeny heterosis can be accounted for by the interaction of genes controlling morphologically divergent traits between the parents. In other cases, progeny heterosis could also be due to divergence between the parents at particular genetic loci that do not control field-level phenotypic differences. Genetic distanceper se between parental genotypes, based on neutral molecular markers, however, does not reflect the potential of individual genotypes to produce heterosis in their progeny.

alfalfafalcatagenetic distanceheterosismorphological distance

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heathcliffe Riday
    • 1
  • E. Charles Brummer
    • 1
  • T. Austin Campbell
    • 2
  • Diane Luth
    • 1
  • Patricia M. Cazcarro
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AgronomyIowa State UniversityAmesU.S.A
  2. 2.Soybean and Alfalfa Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville Agricultural Research CenterBeltsvilleU.S.A