Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 9–15

Thermal analysis of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) hydrogels

Authors

    • Department of Bio-Medical Physics and Bio-EngineeringUniversity of Aberdeen, Foresterhill
  • D. W. L. Hukins
    • Department of Bio-Medical Physics and Bio-EngineeringUniversity of Aberdeen, Foresterhill
  • C. T. Imrie
    • Department of ChemistryUniversity of Aberdeen, Meston Walk
  • R. M. Aspden
    • Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity of Aberdeen, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1021589017753

Cite this article as:
Meakin, J.R., Hukins, D.W.L., Imrie, C.T. et al. Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine (2003) 14: 9. doi:10.1023/A:1021589017753

Abstract

The influence of water on the physical properties of a hydrogel is important for understanding natural tissues and in designing synthetic materials to replace them. In this study, poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) was used as a model system to understand how water interacts with the polymer of a hydrogel. Thermal analysis methods (thermogravimetric analysis coupled to mass spectrometry and differential scanning calorimetry) were used to determine: (i) the total water content of pHEMA gels; (ii) how this water was lost during heating; (iii) the relationship between water content of the gel and its glass transition temperature; and (iv) the behavior of the water in the gel on cooling. Previous researchers have invoked various models to describe the organization of water in a hydrogel. In this study, the simplest model which could explain all of the results from the different thermal analysis techniques was one which consisted of three classes of water: (i) hydration water in close proximity to the polymer; (ii) interstitial water in regions or cavities surrounded by polymer chains; and (iii) bulk water.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003