Behavior Genetics

, Volume 28, Issue 3, pp 173–186

Assortative Mating for Antisocial Behavior: Developmental and Methodological Implications

  • Robert F. Krueger
  • Terrie E. Moffitt
  • Avshalom Caspi
  • April Bleske
  • Phil A. Silva
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1021419013124

Cite this article as:
Krueger, R.F., Moffitt, T.E., Caspi, A. et al. Behav Genet (1998) 28: 173. doi:10.1023/A:1021419013124

Abstract

Do people mate assortatively for antisocial behavior? If so, what are the implications for the development and persistence of antisocial behavior? We investigated assortative mating for antisocial behavior and its correlates in a sample of 360 couples from Dunedin, New Zealand. We found substantial assortative mating for self-reports of antisocial behavior per se and for self-reports of couple members' tendencies to associate with antisocial peers (0.54 on average). Perceptions about the likelihood of social sanctions for antisocial behavior (e.g., being caught by the authorities or losing the respect of one's family) showed moderate assortative mating (0.32 on average). However, assortative mating for personality traits related to antisocial behavior was low (0.15 on average). These findings suggest that, whereas assortative mating for many individual-difference variables (such as personality traits) is low, assortative mating for actual antisocial behaviors is substantial. We conclude that future family studies of antisocial behavior should endeavor to measure and understand the influence of assortative mating. In addition, we outline a testable behavior-genetic model for the development of antisocial behavior, in which genes and environments promoting or discouraging antisocial behavior become concentrated within families (due to assortative mating), giving rise to widely varying individual developmental trajectories that are, nevertheless, similar within families.

Assortative matingantisocial behaviordevelopmentmethodology

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Krueger
    • 1
  • Terrie E. Moffitt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Avshalom Caspi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • April Bleske
    • 1
  • Phil A. Silva
    • 4
  1. 1.University of WisconsinMadison
  2. 2.Institute of PsychiatryUniversity of LondonLondonEngland
  3. 3.Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research CentreInstitute of PsychiatryLondonEngland
  4. 4.University of Otago Medical SchoolDunedinNew Zealand