Aerobiologia

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 175–183

Air-borne fungi at Doha, Qatar

Authors

  • Aisha A.T. Al-Subai
    • Department of EnvironmentQatar General Electricity and Water Corp.
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1021344307205

Cite this article as:
Al-Subai, A.A. Aerobiologia (2002) 18: 175. doi:10.1023/A:1021344307205

Abstract

Thirty-five genera and 73 species, were identifiedfrom 312 daily exposures set up during theperiod March 1997–March 1998. The total fungalcatch exhibited two peaks in July and December1997 and a trough in February 1998. Cladosporium (6 spp. 40.1% of total fungi),Alternaria (4 spp., 21%) andUlocladium (4 spp., 9.2%) were the maincomponents of air-borne fungi, and thecommonest species were Cladosporium.sphaerospermum (29.7%), C.cladosporioides (6.9%), Alternaria.alternata (13.9%) and U. atrum (5%).The predominance of these dark-coloured fungiin air is discussed and is attributed to one orboth of two hypotheses. Aspergillus (9spp., 4.3%) and Penicillium (8 spp.,3.95%) came next and were represented mainlyby A.niger (1.3%) andP. chrysogenum (2.4%).Spore showers of C.cladosporioides, C. sphaerospermum, Penicillium chrysogenum and Myrotheciumverrucaria were noticed with no regularseasonal pattern.The monthly number of species ranalmost parallel to the total count of fungi.The broadest species spectrum (25–29 spp.) wasrecorded in the summer months May–August 1997and the narrowest (11–12 spp.) in February andMarch 1998.The highest monthly wind velocity wasregularly associated with higher fungal colonycounts than in case of the lowest velocity. Onthe other hand, wind direction did not exhibitany regular correlation either with the colonycounts of fungi or with the wind velocity. Highwind velocity could bring more fungal spores tobe sedimented on the surface of exposed agar.Diurnal fluctuations of fungal spores offungi displayed one peak at 12 noon when thehighest temperature and wind velocity, and theleast relative humidity were recorded and onetrough at midnight.

effect of wind velocity and directionseasonal and diurnal variations

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002