Glycoconjugate Journal

, Volume 18, Issue 10, pp 789–797

Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein interaction

  • Urban Olsson
  • Gunnel Östergren-Lundén
  • Jonatan Moses
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1021155518464

Cite this article as:
Olsson, U., Östergren-Lundén, G. & Moses, J. Glycoconj J (2001) 18: 789. doi:10.1023/A:1021155518464

Abstract

Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) bound to various proteoglycans (PGs) present in the cardiovascular system have been proposed to perform a wide range of functions. These include conferring viscoelastic properties; interacting with and modulating growth factors and enzymes; and as receptors and co-receptors in lipoprotein metabolism. Binding of apoB-100 lipoproteins, particularly low density lipoproteins (LDL), to GAGs of extracellular matrix PGs in arteries has been proposed to be an initiating event in development of atherosclerosis. This study was initiated with the aim of getting an overview of the binding patterns of different lipoprotein subclasses with individual GAG categories. We thus evaluated the interaction of lipoproteins with GAGs commonly found in the cardiovascular system using a gel mobility-shift assay developed for this purpose. The same procedure was used to measure lipoproteins binding to metabolically [35S]-labeled whole PGs prepared from three cell types, arterial smooth muscle cells, THP-1 macrophages and from HepG2 cells. The effect of GAG composition on PGs on lipoprotein binding was evaluated by enzymatic degradation of the carbohydrate chains. Heparan sulfate was found to bind beta very low density lipoproteins (β-VLDL) and a chylomicron remnant model (β-VLDL+apoE), but not LDL. Dermatan sulfate was found to bind LDL, but not β-VLDL or the chylomicron remnant model. Chondroitin sulfate and heparin were found to bind all lipoproteins tested (LDL, β-VLDL and β-VLDL+apoE) although with different affinities. We can conclude that each lipoprotein subclass tested binds a specific assortment of the GAGs tested. The observations made contribute to the understanding of new and complex mechanisms by which carbohydrate and lipid metabolism may be linked.

glycosaminoglycanlipoproteinatherosclerosisproteoglycangel mobility-shiftLDLVLDL

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Urban Olsson
    • 1
  • Gunnel Östergren-Lundén
    • 2
  • Jonatan Moses
    • 2
  1. 1.Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular ResearchGöteborg University, Sahlgrenska University HospitalGöteborgSweden
  2. 2.Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular ResearchGöteborg University, Sahlgrenska University HospitalGöteborgSweden