Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 427–440

Association Between Life Satisfaction and Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviors Among Adolescents

  • Robert F. Valois
  • Keith J. Zullig
  • E. Scott Huebner
  • Sandra K. Kammermann
  • J. Wanzer Drane
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1020931324426

Cite this article as:
Valois, R.F., Zullig, K.J., Huebner, E.S. et al. Journal of Child and Family Studies (2002) 11: 427. doi:10.1023/A:1020931324426

Abstract

Relationships between perceived life satisfaction and sexual risk-taking behaviors were examined in a statewide sample of public high school students (n = 4,758) using the self-report CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). Adjusted polychotomous logistic regression analyses and multivariate models (via SUDAAN) constructed separately, revealed a significant race by gender interaction for each race-gender group. Age of first intercourse (≤13), two or more lifetime sexual intercourse partners, alcohol/drug use before last intercourse, no use of contraception at last intercourse, being forced to have sex, forcing someone to have sex, and having beaten up a date in the last 12 months and having been beaten up by a date (in last 12 months) were associated (p = .05) with reduced life satisfaction. Measures of life satisfaction as a component of comprehensive assessments of adolescent sexual risk-taking behaviors in fieldwork, research, and program-evaluation efforts should be considered.

adolescents sexual risk-taking behaviors perceived life satisfaction quality of life 

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Valois
    • 1
    • 2
  • Keith J. Zullig
    • 3
  • E. Scott Huebner
    • 4
  • Sandra K. Kammermann
    • 5
  • J. Wanzer Drane
    • 2
    • 6
  1. 1.Health Promotion, Education & Behavior, Arnold School of Public HealthUniversity of South CarolinaColumbia
  2. 2.Family & Preventive Medicine, School of MedicineUniversity of South CarolinaColumbia
  3. 3.Health StudiesMiami UniversityOxford
  4. 4.School Psychology, College of Liberal Arts & SciencesUniversity of South CarolinaColumbia
  5. 5.Family & Preventive Medicine, School of MedicineUniversity of South CarolinaColumbia
  6. 6.Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public HealthUniversity of South CarolinaColumbia