Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 25, Issue 11, pp 2527–2533

Airborne Chemical Communication in the Wolf Spider Pardosa milvina

  • L. E. Searcy
  • A. L. Rypstra
  • M. H. Persons
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1020878225553

Cite this article as:
Searcy, L.E., Rypstra, A.L. & Persons, M.H. J Chem Ecol (1999) 25: 2527. doi:10.1023/A:1020878225553

Abstract

Most studies involving chemical communication in spiders focus on contact pheromones attached to spider silk. Here we tested if males of the wolf spider Pardosa milvina use airborne pheromones to identify, locate, and follow females. Using a two-choice olfactometer, we tested the response of adult male P. milvina to a number of potential chemical cues while controlling for concomitant visual and vibratory stimuli. An airborne chemical cue from adult virgin female P. milvina elicited a positive taxis response from the male. We also tested adult male responses to penultimate instar female P. milvina, one adult male P. milvina, and two adult males together. In each case, test males showed no attraction to the stimuli. Additional experiments were run with pitfall traps baited with adult virgin female P. milvina as attractants. Again, we controlled for visual and vibratory cues from females. Pitfall traps containing virgin females captured significantly more males than control traps. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate evidence of an airborne sex pheromone in P. milvina.

Pardosa milvinaLycosidaeairbornesex pheromonewolf spiderolfactometerpitfall traps

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. E. Searcy
    • 1
  • A. L. Rypstra
    • 1
  • M. H. Persons
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyMiami UniversityOxford
  2. 2.Department of BiologySusquehanna UniversitySelinsgrove