Research in Higher Education

, Volume 39, Issue 3, pp 299–318

AFFINITY DISCIPLINES AND THE USE OF PRINCIPLES OF GOOD PRACTICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

  • Authors
  • John M. Braxton
  • Deborah Olsen
  • Ada Simmons
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1018729101473

Cite this article as:
Braxton, J.M., Olsen, D. & Simmons, A. Research in Higher Education (1998) 39: 299. doi:10.1023/A:1018729101473

Abstract

Academic disciplines with soft paradigmaticdevelopment tend to have an affinity for more readilyenacting practices designed to improve undergraduateeducation than do hard paradigmatic developmentdisciplines. This study extends the affinity disciplinehypothesis to Chickering and Gamson's seven principlesof good practice. The affinity discipline hypothesisgarners empirical support for four of the sevenprinciples of good practice: encouragement offaculty-student contact, encouragement of activelearning, communication of high expectations, andrespect for diverse talents and ways of knowing.Implications for theory and practice are suggested by the findings ofthis study.

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1998