Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 22, Issue 5, pp 419–436

The Role of Cultural Variables in Breast Self-Examination and Cervical Cancer Screening Behavior in Young Asian Women Living in the United States

  • Tricia S. Tang
  • Laura J. Solomon
  • C. Joann Yeh
  • John K. Worden
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1018653306776

Cite this article as:
Tang, T.S., Solomon, L.J., Yeh, C.J. et al. J Behav Med (1999) 22: 419. doi:10.1023/A:1018653306776

Abstract

This study examined cultural factors as predictors of breast self-examination (BSE) and participation in cervical cancer screening in young Asian and Caucasian women in the United States. Comparisons between Asian and Caucasian samples revealed significant differences in ever performing BSE and obtaining a pap test; the Caucasian women reported higher participation in both behaviors. Factor analysis of cultural barriers to screening revealed four factors: communication with mother, openness around sexuality, prevention orientation, and utilization of Western medicine. Logistic regression predicting BSE performance from demographics, acculturation, and cultural barriers revealed openness around sexuality to be a significant predictor. Pap test participation was predicted by year in college, ever having engaged in sexual intercourse, prevention orientation, and global acculturation. Cultural factors should be considered in programs to enhance participation in cancer screening.

CANCER SCREENINGASIAN-AMERICAN WOMENCULTURAL BARRIERSACCULTURATION

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tricia S. Tang
  • Laura J. Solomon
  • C. Joann Yeh
  • John K. Worden

There are no affiliations available