Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 67, Issue 3, pp 255–262

Mental adjustment to first recurrence and correlated factors in patients with breast cancer

Authors

  • Yoshie Okano
    • Psycho-Oncology DivisionNational Cancer Center Research Institute East
    • Department of Adult Nursing/Terminal and Long-term Care Nursing, Graduate School of MedicineThe University of Tokyo
  • Hitoshi Okamura
    • Psycho-Oncology DivisionNational Cancer Center Research Institute East
    • Psychiatry DivisionNational Cancer Center Hospital East
  • Toru Watanabe
    • Department of Medical OncologyNational Cancer Center Hospital
  • Masaru Narabayashi
    • Department of Medical OncologyNational Cancer Center Hospital
  • Noriyuki Katsumata
    • Department of Medical OncologyNational Cancer Center Hospital
  • Masashi Ando
    • Department of Medical OncologyNational Cancer Center Hospital
  • Isamu Adachi
    • Department of Medical OncologyNational Cancer Center Hospital
  • Keiko Kazuma
    • Department of Adult Nursing/Terminal and Long-term Care Nursing, Graduate School of MedicineThe University of Tokyo
  • Tatsuo Akechi
    • Psycho-Oncology DivisionNational Cancer Center Research Institute East
  • Yosuke Uchitomi
    • Psycho-Oncology DivisionNational Cancer Center Research Institute East
    • Psychiatry DivisionNational Cancer Center Hospital East
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1017942709369

Cite this article as:
Okano, Y., Okamura, H., Watanabe, T. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2001) 67: 255. doi:10.1023/A:1017942709369

Abstract

Previous reports have demonstrated that breast cancer patients felt that news of their recurrence was more upsetting than their initial diagnosis. However, no studies have examined the factors that are correlated with mental adjustment in breast cancer patients who experienced recurrence. The authors investigated factors that are correlated with mental adjustment styles of fighting spirit or helplessness/hopelessness in women with breast cancer with a first recurrence. Fifty-five participants were interviewed and completed the Mental Adjustment to Cancer scale. Factors that correlated significantly with fighting spirit were performance status and history of major depression, while factors that correlated significantly with helplessness/hopelessness were age, pain, and history of major depression. These findings suggest that it is necessary to provide intervention for first recurrent breast cancer patients who have such biomedical factors, as young age, poor performance status, pain, and history of major depression to help them better cope with cancer.

breast cancer first recurrence history of major depression mental adjustment

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001