Human Ecology

, Volume 30, Issue 3, pp 397–416

Bushmeat Consumption and Preferences of Two Ethnic Groups in Bioko Island, West Africa

  • John E. Fa
  • Javier Juste
  • Robert W. Burn
  • Genevieve Broad
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1016524703607

Cite this article as:
Fa, J.E., Juste, J., Burn, R.W. et al. Human Ecology (2002) 30: 397. doi:10.1023/A:1016524703607

Abstract

We studied consumption and preference of meats of wild species (bushmeat) by inhabitants of Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. The aim of the study was to quantify frequency of consumption and stated preferences of the two main ethnic groups (Bubi and Fang) in the island. Although members of both ethnic groups lived on the island, the Fang originated from the continent and maintained strong links with this area. Thus, preference and consumption of the Fang reflected exposure to animals found in the continent as well as on Bioko. A sample of 196 subjects (115 Bubi and 81 Fang) was interviewed using semistructured questionnaires. A total of 55 different bushmeat species was identified as preferred or consumed by interviewees. Principal component analyses of stated consumption and preference indicated differences between ethnic groups in their general responses. Further analyses of the effects of preference and other factors on consumption of the three main species mentioned (blue duiker (Cephalophus monticola), Emin's rat (Cricetomys emini), and brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus) were undertaken. Proportional odds logistic regression models for ordered categorical response data were employed. Results indicated that age and sex of the respondent did not affect consumption, but ethnic group was statistically significant for the three-study species. Consumption and preference of the different meats (N = 11 species) in relation to their availability in the market and price was studied using multiple linear regressions. Consumption is driven predominantly by availability but there is some influence of preference; price of the meat did not have a significant influence.

bushmeatBiokoAfricadietpreferencesconservation

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • John E. Fa
    • 1
  • Javier Juste
    • 2
    • 3
  • Robert W. Burn
    • 4
  • Genevieve Broad
    • 1
  1. 1.Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Les Augrés Manor, TrinityJerseyUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.Estación Biológica de Doñana, C.S.I.C., Pabellon del PéruSpain
  3. 3.Dpto. Bioquímica y Biol. Mol. IV. Facultad de VeterinariaUniversidad Complutense de MadridMadridSpain
  4. 4.Statistical Services CentreThe University of ReadingReadingUnited Kingdom