Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 74, Issue 3, pp 235–254

The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project: Description of a Multi-Institutional Collaboration to Identify Environmental Risk Factors for Breast Cancer

  • Marilie D. Gammon
  • Alfred I. Neugut
  • Regina M. Santella
  • Susan L. Teitelbaum
  • Julie A. Britton
  • Mary Beth Terry
  • Sybil M. Eng
  • Mary S. Wolff
  • Steven D. Stellman
  • Geoffrey C. Kabat
  • Bruce Levin
  • H. Leon Bradlow
  • Maureen Hatch
  • Jan Beyea
  • David Camann
  • Martin Trent
  • Ruby T. Senie
  • Gail C. Garbowski
  • Carla Maffeo
  • Pat Montalvan
  • Gertrud S. Berkowitz
  • Margaret Kemeny
  • Marc Citron
  • Freya Schnabel
  • Allan Schuss
  • Steven Hajdu
  • Vincent Vincguerra
  • Gwen W. Collman
  • G. Iris Obrams
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1016387020854

Cite this article as:
Gammon, M.D., Neugut, A.I., Santella, R.M. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2002) 74: 235. doi:10.1023/A:1016387020854

Abstract

The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project is a federally mandated, population-based case-control study to determine whether breast cancer risk among women in the counties of Nassau and Suffolk, NY, is associated with selected environmental exposures, assessed by blood samples, self-reports, and environmental home samples. This report describes the collaborative project's background, rationale, methods, participation rates, and distributions of known risk factors for breast cancer by case-control status, by blood donation, and by availability of environmental home samples. Interview response rates among eligible cases and controls were 82.1% (n, = 1,508) and 62.8% (n = 1,556), respectively. Among case and control respondents who completed the interviewer-administered questionnaire, 98.2 and 97.6% self-completed the food frequency questionnaire; 73.0 and 73.3% donated a blood sample; and 93.0 and 83.3% donated a urine sample. Among a random sample of case and control respondents who are long-term residents, samples of dust (83.6 and 83.0%); soil (93.5 and 89.7%); and water (94.3 and 93.9%) were collected. Established risk factors for breast cancer that were found to increase risk among Long Island women include lower parity, late age at first birth, little or no breast feeding, and family history of breast cancer. Factors that were found to be associated with a decreased likelihood that a respondent would donate blood include increasing age and past smoking; factors associated with an increased probability include white or other race, alcohol use, ever breastfed, ever use of hormone replacement therapy, ever use of oral contraceptives, and ever had a mammogram. Long-term residents (defined as 15+ years in the interview home) with environmental home samples did not differ from other long-term residents, although there were a number of differences in risk factor distributions between long-term residents and other participants, as anticipated.

breast cancer environment case-control study DDT epidemiologic methods hormones Long Island organochlorines PAH PCBs 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilie D. Gammon
    • 1
  • Alfred I. Neugut
    • 2
    • 3
  • Regina M. Santella
    • 4
  • Susan L. Teitelbaum
    • 2
  • Julie A. Britton
    • 5
  • Mary Beth Terry
    • 2
  • Sybil M. Eng
    • 2
  • Mary S. Wolff
    • 5
  • Steven D. Stellman
    • 6
  • Geoffrey C. Kabat
    • 7
  • Bruce Levin
    • 8
  • H. Leon Bradlow
    • 9
  • Maureen Hatch
    • 5
  • Jan Beyea
    • 10
  • David Camann
    • 11
  • Martin Trent
    • 12
  • Ruby T. Senie
    • 2
    • 13
  • Gail C. Garbowski
    • 2
  • Carla Maffeo
    • 14
  • Pat Montalvan
    • 14
  • Gertrud S. Berkowitz
    • 5
  • Margaret Kemeny
    • 15
  • Marc Citron
    • 16
  • Freya Schnabel
    • 17
    • 18
  • Allan Schuss
    • 19
  • Steven Hajdu
    • 20
  • Vincent Vincguerra
    • 21
  • Gwen W. Collman
    • 22
  • G. Iris Obrams
    • 23
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public HealthUniversity of North CarolinaChapel Hill
  2. 2.Division of EpidemiologyJoseph L. Mailman School of Public HealthNew York
  3. 3.Department of MedicineCollege of Physicians & SurgeonsNew York
  4. 4.Division of Environmental Health Sciences, Joseph L. Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew York
  5. 5.Department of Community and Preventive MedicineMt. Sinai School of MedicineNew York
  6. 6.American Health FoundationNew York
  7. 7.Department of Preventive MedicineState University of New YorkStony Brook, New York
  8. 8.Division of Biostatistics, Joseph L. Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew York
  9. 9.Strang Research LaboratoryCornell Medical CenterNew York
  10. 10.Consulting in the Public InterestLambertville
  11. 11.Southwest Research InstituteSan Antonio
  12. 12.Suffolk County Department of Health ServicesHauppauge
  13. 13.Division of Sociomedical Sciences, Joseph L. Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew York
  14. 14.Westat, Inc.Rockville
  15. 15.Department of SurgeryState University of New YorkStony Brook
  16. 16.Department of MedicineLong Island Jewish Medical CenterQueens
  17. 17.Department of SurgeryColumbia University, College of Physicians & SurgeonsNew York
  18. 18.Department of SurgerySouth Nassau Communities HospitalOceanside
  19. 19.Department of PathologyWinthrop University HospitalMineola
  20. 20.Department of PathologyNorth Shore University HospitalManhasset
  21. 21.Don Monti Division of OncologyNorth Shore University HospitalManhasset
  22. 22.National Institute of Environmental Health SciencesResearch Triangle Park
  23. 23.National Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA