Pharmaceutical Research

, Volume 12, Issue 10, pp 1407–1416

Thermosensitive Sterically Stabilized Liposomes: Formulation and in Vitro Studies on Mechanism of Doxorubicin Release by Bovine Serum and Human Plasma

Authors

  • Mohamed H. Gaber
    • Cancer Research Institute and Department of PharmacologyUniversity of California San Francisco
    • Faculty of Science, Biophysics Dept.Cairo University
  • Keelung Hong
    • Cancer Research Institute and Department of PharmacologyUniversity of California San Francisco
  • Shi Kun Huang
    • Liposome Technology, Inc.
  • Demetrios Papahadjopoulos
    • Cancer Research Institute and Department of PharmacologyUniversity of California San Francisco
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1016206631006

Cite this article as:
Gaber, M.H., Hong, K., Huang, S.K. et al. Pharm Res (1995) 12: 1407. doi:10.1023/A:1016206631006

Abstract

Purpose. To formulate thermosensitive sterically stabilized liposomes and to study the effects of plasma and serum components in vitro.

Methods. The rate of release of encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) from liposomes of various compositions was followed by fluorometric assay at 37°, 42° and 45°C, in buffer and also in both calf serum and human plasma up to 50% by volume.

Results. The optimal composition for the maximal differential release of doxorubicin between 37°C and 42°C in human plasma was a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol and distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine derivatized with polyethylene glycol at a molar ratio of 100:50:30:6. In experiments designed to study the mechanism causing increased permeability of liposomes in bovine serum, we found two different distinct release patterns: a slow linear rise of rate of Dox release for fluid liposomes and fast exponential rise reaching plateau within 5 minutes for solid phase (rigid) liposomes. This release of Dox from rigid but not fluid liposomes was inhibited by pre-heating serum at 55°C for 30 minutes or by addition of EDTA (but not EGTA) or antiserum to the C3 component of complement.

Conclusions. A formulation of sterically stabilized liposomes with the proper thermal sensitivity in human plasma has been obtained. In addition, the results suggest that complement may play an important role in the interaction of rigid but not fluid liposomes with bovine serum. Human plasma did not show this effect.

liposomesdoxorubicindrug carrierthermosensitivityhyperthermiabovine serumhuman plasmacomplement

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995