Plant and Soil

, Volume 241, Issue 1, pp 105–113

Phytosiderophore release from nodal, primary, and complete root systems in maize

  • Mark L. Bernards
  • Von D. Jolley
  • W. Bart Stevens
  • Gary W. Hergert
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1016084023377

Cite this article as:
Bernards, M.L., Jolley, V.D., Stevens, W.B. et al. Plant and Soil (2002) 241: 105. doi:10.1023/A:1016084023377

Abstract

Some maize (Zea mays L.) hybrids grown in high pH soil in Nebraska suffer from severely reduced yields caused by iron (Fe) deficiency chlorosis. Hybrids which recover from early season Fe-deficiency chlorosis and yield well are termed Fe-efficient or tolerant. Most Fe-efficient gramineous species respond to Fe-deficiency stress by releasing phytosiderophores (mugineic acid and its derivatives) into the rhizosphere, thereby increasing Fe availability and uptake of the Fe3+-phytosiderophore complex via a high affinity uptake system. Field-grown Fe-efficient maize recovers from Fe-deficiency chlorosis at a stage when nodal roots have become the dominant root system. Quantifying phytosiderophore release from hydroponically grown plants has been proposed as a viable alternative to time-consuming and variable field trials and has been used successfully to delineate among Fe-efficient and Fe-inefficient lines of oat (Avena sativa L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Our objectives were (1) to determine if phytosiderophore release differed between nodal- and primary-root systems of maize, and (2) to compare phytosiderophore release from 12 hybrids. Root exudates secreted during daily 4-h collections were analyzed for their Fe-solubilizing ability, which was equated to phytosiderophore release. Nodal root systems released significantly more phytosiderophore than primary- or complete-root systems. In early experiments, an Fe-efficient hybrid (P3279) released more phytosiderophore from nodal roots than an Fe-inefficient hybrid (P3489). Tests of an additional 10 hybrids showed that phytosiderophore release varied significantly among the cultivars but did not clearly distinguish between hybrids classified as Fe-efficient or Fe-inefficient in individual company trials. We recommend using nodal roots when studying Fe-stress response mechanisms in maize.

iron deficiencymaizenodal rootsphytosiderophore release

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark L. Bernards
    • 1
  • Von D. Jolley
    • 1
  • W. Bart Stevens
    • 2
  • Gary W. Hergert
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Agronomy and HorticultureBrigham Young UniversityProvoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Renewable ResourcesUniversity of WyomingLaramieUSA
  3. 3.University of Nebraska – West Central Research and Extension CenterNorth PlatteUSA