Journal of Quantitative Criminology

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 135–157

Disentangling the Effects of Self-Protective Behaviors on the Risk of Injury in Assaults Against Women

  • Ronet Bachman
  • Linda E. Saltzman
  • Martie P. Thompson
  • Dianne C. Carmody
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1015254631767

Cite this article as:
Bachman, R., Saltzman, L.E., Thompson, M.P. et al. Journal of Quantitative Criminology (2002) 18: 135. doi:10.1023/A:1015254631767

Abstract

Using data from the National Crime Victimization Survey, this paper attempts to disentangle the effects of self-protective behaviors on the risk of injury in assaults against women. Unlike previous research, in this study we address simultaneously three important conceptual and methodological issues: (1) type of self-protective behavior, (2) temporal sequencing of self-protective behavior in relation to injury, and (3) the victim/offender relationship. Results indicate that even after controlling for other contextual characteristics of an assault, the probability of a woman being injured was lowest when she employed non-physical resistance strategies such as arguing or reasoning with the offender. This was true for all types of offenders. However, for assaults involving intimates, the probability of injury was increased for women who physically resisted their attackers.

resistance violence injury 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronet Bachman
    • 1
  • Linda E. Saltzman
    • 2
  • Martie P. Thompson
    • 2
  • Dianne C. Carmody
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Criminal JusticeUniversity of DelawareNewark
  2. 2.Division of Violence PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlanta
  3. 3.Old Dominion UniversityNorfolk

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