Journal of Business Ethics

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 141–151

The Social and Environmental Responsibilities of Multinationals: Evidence from the Brent Spar Case

Authors

  • Stelios C. Zyglidopoulos
    • College of BusinessRochester Institute of Technology
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1014262025188

Cite this article as:
Zyglidopoulos, S.C. Journal of Business Ethics (2002) 36: 141. doi:10.1023/A:1014262025188

Abstract

This paper argues that multinational corporations face levels of environmental and social responsibility higher than their national counterparts. Drawing on the literatures of stakeholder salience, corporate reputation management, and evidence from the confrontation between Shell and Greenpeace over the Brent Spar, in 1995, two mechanisms – international reputation side effects, and foreign stakeholder salience – are identified and their contribution in creating an environment more restrictive, in terms of environmental and social responsibility, is elaborated on. The paper concludes with discussing the links of the work presented here with a number of ongoing debates within the filed of international business ethics, and the managerial implications of the two mechanisms identified.

corporate reputationinternational social and environmental responsibilityinternational crisis managementinternational ethicsstakeholder salience

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002