Journal of Family Violence

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 291–307

Conduct Problems Among Children at Battered Women's Shelters: Prevalence and Stability of Maternal Reports

Authors

  • Holly Shinn Ware
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Houston
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Houston
  • Laura C. Spiller
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Houston
  • Renee McDonald
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Houston
  • Paul R. Swank
    • Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Houston
  • William D. Norwood
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Houston
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1011190316783

Cite this article as:
Ware, H.S., Jouriles, E.N., Spiller, L.C. et al. Journal of Family Violence (2001) 16: 291. doi:10.1023/A:1011190316783

Abstract

The present research was designed to (1) replicate prevalence estimates of clinical levels of conduct problems in a large (n = 401) sample of children residing at a shelter for battered women, and (2) assess the stability of mothers' reports of child conduct problems following shelter departure. According to mothers' reports on standardized questionnaires and diagnostic interviews obtained during shelter residence, approximately one third of the children between 4 and 10 years of age exhibited clinical levels of conduct problems. Prior research has demonstrated elevated maternal distress during shelter residence and suggests that such distress may influence mothers' reports of child conduct problems. To examine this issue, a subset of families with children exhibiting clinical levels of conduct problems (n = 68) was reassessed following their shelter departure. Mothers' reports of child conduct problems remained stable despite significant reductions in mothers' distress after shelter exit.

child conduct problemsexternalizing problemsbattered womenwife abuse

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001