Reality vs. rhetoric – a survey and evaluation of tsetse control in East Africa

  • Bob Brightwell
  • Bob Dransfield
  • Ian Maudlin
  • Peter Stevenson
  • Alex Shaw
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1011131826919

Cite this article as:
Brightwell, B., Dransfield, B., Maudlin, I. et al. Agriculture and Human Values (2001) 18: 219. doi:10.1023/A:1011131826919

Abstract

Odor baited methods of controlling tsetse have received considerable attention as ecologically friendly ways for African farmers to reduce their levels of livestock trypanosomosis. Over the last decade, a number of tsetse control projects have been set up in East Africa using these methods. Although much has been written, few hard data are available regarding their ongoing success, problems, and sustainability. To evaluate the situation on the ground, the authors conducted a series of site visits to a number of such tsetse control projects in Kenya. A comparison of these projects with others across the region identified the possible constraints to a wider uptake of these methods. Poor information, coupled with inappropriate research and development policies, were found to be the key constraints. These could be overcome with a farmer-based approach to control, with a better application of existing techniques, and with a greater role for veterinarians. Tsetse control needs to become demand rather than supply driven, if it is to bean important component of livestock disease control in Africa.

Control Community participation East Africa Glossina Trypanosomosis Tsetse fly 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bob Brightwell
    • 1
  • Bob Dransfield
    • 2
  • Ian Maudlin
    • 3
  • Peter Stevenson
    • 4
  • Alex Shaw
    • 5
  1. 1.LewisUK
  2. 2.Farming in Tsetse Control Areas of East Africa (FITUganda
  3. 3.Sir Alexander Robertson Centre for Tropical Veterinary MedicineUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  4. 4.SouthamptonUK
  5. 5.AndoverUK