Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 231–245

Social Support, Intrusive Thoughts, and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors

  • Julie A. Lewis
  • Sharon L. Manne
  • Katherine N. DuHamel
  • Suzanne M. Johnson Vickburg
  • Dana H. Bovbjerg
  • Violante Currie
  • Gary Winkel
  • William H. Redd
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1010714722844

Cite this article as:
Lewis, J.A., Manne, S.L., DuHamel, K.N. et al. J Behav Med (2001) 24: 231. doi:10.1023/A:1010714722844

Abstract

This study explores the moderating effect of social support on the relationship between cancer-related intrusive thoughts and quality of life. Sixty-four breast cancer survivors completed self-report measures of appraisal social support (the disclosure of thoughts and feelings to significant others), cancer-related intrusive thoughts, and quality of life. Controlling for demographic and treatment variables, the negative impact of cancer-related intrusive thoughts on both physical and mental quality of life measures was moderated by appraisal social support. For women with high levels of appraisal support, cancer-related intrusive thoughts had no significant relationship with quality of life. However, for women with low levels of appraisal support, the relationship between cancer-related intrusive thoughts and quality of life was significant and negative. These results suggest that appraisal social support can mitigate the impact of traumatic life events.

social supportintrusive thoughtsbreast cancerquality of life

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie A. Lewis
  • Sharon L. Manne
  • Katherine N. DuHamel
  • Suzanne M. Johnson Vickburg
  • Dana H. Bovbjerg
  • Violante Currie
  • Gary Winkel
  • William H. Redd

There are no affiliations available