Climatic Change

, Volume 49, Issue 4, pp 441–462

The Late Maunder Minimum (1675–1715) – A Key Period forStudying Decadal Scale Climatic Change in Europe

  • J. Luterbacher
  • R. Rickli
  • E. Xoplaki
  • C. Tinguely
  • C. Beck
  • C. Pfister
  • H. Wanner
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1010667524422

Cite this article as:
Luterbacher, J., Rickli, R., Xoplaki, E. et al. Climatic Change (2001) 49: 441. doi:10.1023/A:1010667524422

Abstract

The Late Maunder Minimum (LMM, 1675–1715) denotes the climax of the `Little Ice Age' in Europe with marked climate variability. Investigations into interannual and interdecadal differences of atmospheric circulation between the LMM and the period 1961–1990 have been performedand undertaken based upon sea level pressure (SLP) difference maps, empiricalorthogonal function (EOF) analysis, and objective classification techniques. Since the SLP during the LMM winterwas significantly higher in northeastern Europe but below normal over the central and western Mediterranean, more frequent blocking situations were connected with cold air outbreaks towards central and eastern Europe. Springs were cold and characterized by a southward shift of the mid-latitude storm tracks. Summers in western, central Europe and northern Europe were wetter and slightly cooler than they are today due to a weakerAzores high and a more southerly position of the mean polar front axes. Autumns showed a significantly higher pressure over northern Europe and a lower pressure over continental Europe and the Mediterranean, an indication of an advanced change from summer to winter circulation. It is suggested that the pressure patterns during parts of the LMM might be attributed to the combination of external forcing factors (solar irradiance and volcanic activity) and internal oscillations and couplings in the North Atlantic.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Luterbacher
    • 1
  • R. Rickli
    • 1
  • E. Xoplaki
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Tinguely
    • 1
  • C. Beck
    • 3
  • C. Pfister
    • 4
  • H. Wanner
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of GeographyUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of Meteorology and ClimatologyUniversity of ThessalonikiGreece
  3. 3.Institute of GeographyJulius-Maximilians-UniversitätWürzburgGermany
  4. 4.Institute of HistoryUniversity of BernSwitzerland