Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 128, Issue 1, pp 97–114

N Storage and Cycling in Vegetation of a Forested Wetland: Implications for Watershed N Processing

Authors

  • Joseph M. Bischoff
    • Department of BiologyUniversity of Louisville
  • Paul Bukaveckas
    • Department of BiologyUniversity of Louisville
  • Myron J. Mitchell
    • College of Environmental Science and ForestryState University of New York
  • T. Hurd
    • College of Environmental Science and ForestryState University of New York
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1010358216481

Cite this article as:
Bischoff, J.M., Bukaveckas, P., Mitchell, M.J. et al. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution (2001) 128: 97. doi:10.1023/A:1010358216481

Abstract

Pools and fluxes of N in wetland vegetation and soils were compared with an adjacent upland site to assess the relative importance of wetland versus upland landscapes in watershedN-retention in the Adirondack Mountains of New York (U.S.A.).The majority of N storage occurred in forest soils and wetlandpeat deposits (96 and 99% of total N in upland forests andwetlands, respectively). Annual N-uptake (49 kg N ha-1yr-1) was greater for wetland vegetation than that ofupland vegetation (30 kg N ha-1 yr-1). In the wetlandthe supply of N from mineralization (36 kg N ha-1yr-1) was less than N-uptake; in contrast, upland Nmineralization (76 kg N ha-1 yr-1) exceeded Nvegetation uptake. Annual N-storage in peat was small due to low peat accretion rates. Wetlands acted as a sink for N andstored a disproportionally high fraction (15%) of catchment Nin relation to their relatively small surface area (∼4%)within the catchment.

nitrogenwatershedwetlands

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001