Mangroves and Salt Marshes

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 243–253

Use of mangroves by traditional fishermen in Madagascar

Authors

  • Marguerite V. Rasolofo
    • Département Océanographie BiologiqueCentre National de Recherches
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1009923022474

Cite this article as:
Rasolofo, M.V. Mangroves and Salt Marshes (1997) 1: 243. doi:10.1023/A:1009923022474

Abstract

Traditional fishing is intensive in Ambaro Bay and around Morondava, respectively on the northwest and western coast of Madagascar. This fishing relies extensively on forest products much of which originates from nearby, readily accessible mangroves. Mangrove wood is used extensively for making the fishing traps and the canoes, for processing the prawn and fish catch, and for domestic use including fencing, housing and fuel for cooking. The increasing scarcity of forest species suggest an over-exploitation as well as a degradation of the ecosystem. A management plan is needed to ensure the long-term survival of the resources.

Madagascartraditional fishingecosystemsmangrove woodmanagement

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997