Plant Ecology

, Volume 145, Issue 2, pp 351–358

Photoinhibition by visible and ultraviolet radiation in the red macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis grown in the laboratory

Authors

  • Donat-P. Häder
    • Institut für Botanik und Pharmazeutische BiologieFriedrich-Alexander-Universität
  • Almut Gröniger
    • Institut für Botanik und Pharmazeutische BiologieFriedrich-Alexander-Universität
  • Caroline Hallier
    • School of Biological SciencesUniversity of Portsmouth
  • Michael Lebert
    • Institut für Botanik und Pharmazeutische BiologieFriedrich-Alexander-Universität
  • Felix L. Figueroa
    • Departamento de Ecologia, Facultad de CienciasUniversidad de Málaga
  • Carlos Jiménez
    • Departamento de Ecologia, Facultad de CienciasUniversidad de Málaga
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1009833520770

Cite this article as:
Häder, D., Gröniger, A., Hallier, C. et al. Plant Ecology (1999) 145: 351. doi:10.1023/A:1009833520770

Abstract

Photosynthetic oxygen production and PAM fluorescence measurements were used to follow photoinhibition in the red macroalga Porphyra umbilicalis. Exposure to simulated solar radiation caused inhibition of the effective photosynthetic quantum yield from which the thalli partially recovered in the shade in subsequent hours. There were no significant differences between samples exposed to unfiltered radiation and those exposed to radiation from which increasing portions of UV radiation had been removed indicating that the thalli are well adapted to current levels of solar PAR and UV radiation. This notion was supported by the finding of high concentrations of UV screening pigments which were even enhanced by exposure to increased UV radiation. However, when exposed to (only) UV radiation about 50% higher than that encountered by the organisms in their natural habitat, the photosynthetic yield decreased slowly and did not show any recovery even when the degree of inhibition did not exceed 10%.

oxygen measurementsPAM fluorescencephotoinhibitionPorphyrarhodophytaultraviolet radiation

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999