AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 279–287

Future HIV Prevention Options for Men Who Have Sex with Men: Intention to Use a Potential Microbicide During Anal Intercourse

  • Gary Marks
  • Gordon Mansergh
  • Nicole Crepaz
  • Sheila Murphy
  • Lynn C. Miller
  • Paul Robert Appleby
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1009572919712

Cite this article as:
Marks, G., Mansergh, G., Crepaz, N. et al. AIDS Behav (2000) 4: 279. doi:10.1023/A:1009572919712

Abstract

Development of an effective rectal microbicide holds promise for HIV prevention. This study examined men's personal efficacy standards (i.e., preferences about product efficacy) for a future rectal microbicide and intentions to use it during anal intercourse. Three hundred eighty-five men who have sex with men, sampled in West Hollywood, completed a behavioral questionnaire, read a detailed description of a potential rectal microbicide gel, and expressed their preferences about product efficacy and intended use. On average, participants wanted a microbicide gel to be 84% effective in preventing HIV infection before they would use it as the only means of protection during anal intercourse; 53% of the men wanted the gel to be at least 95% effective. In multivariate analyses, intention to use the gel by itself was associated with higher efficacy standards for the microbicide, negative attitudes about using condoms, and a history of unprotected anal intercourse. Thirty-seven percent of the men who always used a condom during anal sex in the past year said they would be more likely to use a microbicide gel than a condom in the future; however, 85% of this subgroup wanted the gel to offer protection comparable to a condom before they would use it alone. In conclusion, an effective rectal microbicide may have a sizable public health benefit because it provides an alternative for men who dislike condoms.

microbicidesMSMHIVAIDSsexual risk

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary Marks
    • 1
  • Gordon Mansergh
    • 2
  • Nicole Crepaz
    • 2
  • Sheila Murphy
    • 3
  • Lynn C. Miller
    • 3
  • Paul Robert Appleby
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of HIV/AIDS PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlanta
  2. 2.Division of HIV/AIDS PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlanta
  3. 3.University of Southern CaliforniaLos Angeles