AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp 147–158

HIV Disclosure Among Women of African Descent: Associations with Coping, Social Support, and Psychological Adaptation

  • Jane M. Simoni
  • Penelope Demas
  • Hyacinth R. C. Mason
  • Jill A. Drossman
  • Michelle L. Davis
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1009508406855

Cite this article as:
Simoni, J.M., Demas, P., Mason, H.R.C. et al. AIDS Behav (2000) 4: 147. doi:10.1023/A:1009508406855

Abstract

Trained interviewers recruited and interviewed a nonprobability sample of HIV-positive women from outpatient clinics and scatter site housing in New York City. Hispanic Black (n = 37) and non-Hispanic Black (n = 106) women reported high rates of HIV disclosure to family, friends, and lovers; few ethnic differences were noted. Bivariate analyses revealed disclosure was related to greater frequency of HIV-related social support, although not directly to less depressive symptomatology (CES-D) or mood disturbance (POMS-TMD) scores. Additionally, disclosure rates were positively associated with the use of more adaptive coping strategies (i.e., spiritual resilience, constructive cognitions, and community involvement). Multiple regression analyses indicated satisfaction with social support mediated the relationship between adaptive coping and psychological distress. The discussion considers HIV disclosure within the constellation of processes leading to successful adaptation to HIV/AIDS.

HIV/AIDSAfrican Americanswomendisclosurepsychological adaptationcopingsocial support

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane M. Simoni
    • 1
  • Penelope Demas
    • 2
  • Hyacinth R. C. Mason
    • 3
  • Jill A. Drossman
    • 1
  • Michelle L. Davis
    • 1
  1. 1.Ferkauf Graduate School of PsychologyYeshiva UniversityBronx
  2. 2.Montefiore Medical CenterBronx
  3. 3.Department of Preventive MedicineUniversity of Southern California School of MedicineLos Angeles