Chromosome Research

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 25–33

Separate and variably shaped chromosome arm domains are disclosed by chromosome arm painting in human cell nuclei

  • Steffen Dietzel
  • Anna Jauch
  • Dirk Kienle
  • Guoquiong Qu
  • Heidi Holtgreve-Grez
  • Roland Eils
  • Christian Munkel
  • Michael Bittner
  • Paul S. Meltzer
  • Jeffrey M. Trent
  • Thomas Cremer
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1009262223693

Cite this article as:
Dietzel, S., Jauch, A., Kienle, D. et al. Chromosome Res (1998) 6: 25. doi:10.1023/A:1009262223693

Abstract

Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with microdissection probes from human chromosomes 3 and 6 was applied to visualize arm and subregional band domains in human amniotic fluid cell nuclei. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and quantitative three-dimensional image analysis showed a pronounced variability of p- and q-arm domain arrangements and shapes. Apparent intermingling of neighbouring arm domains was limited to the domain surface. Three-dimensional distance measurements with pter and qter probes supported a high variability of chromosome territory folding.

chromosome armschromosome structurechromosome territoriesconfocal microscopyfluorescence in situ hybridizationnuclear organizationrandom walk/giant loop model

Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steffen Dietzel
    • 1
  • Anna Jauch
    • 2
  • Dirk Kienle
    • 2
  • Guoquiong Qu
    • 2
  • Heidi Holtgreve-Grez
    • 3
  • Roland Eils
    • 4
  • Christian Munkel
    • 5
  • Michael Bittner
    • 2
  • Paul S. Meltzer
    • 2
  • Jeffrey M. Trent
    • 2
  • Thomas Cremer
    • 2
  1. 1.Center of Molecular BiologyUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Human Genetics, University of Heidelberg HeidelbergGermany
  3. 3.Interdisciplinary Center of Scientific ComputingUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  4. 4.Division of Biophysics of Macromolecules, Deutsches KrebsforschungszentrumHeidelbergGermany
  5. 5.Laboratory of Cancer GeneticsNational Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA