Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 65–77

Premorbid diet in relation to survival from prostate cancer (Canada)

  • Daniel J. Kim
  • Richard P. Gallagher
  • T. Gregory Hislop
  • Eric J. Holowaty
  • Geoffrey R. Howe
  • Meera Jain
  • John R. McLaughlin
  • Chong-Ze Teh
  • Thomas E. Rohan
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1008913620344

Cite this article as:
Kim, D.J., Gallagher, R.P., Hislop, T.G. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2000) 11: 65. doi:10.1023/A:1008913620344

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the associations between prediagnostic energy, fat, and vitamin A intake and survival from prostate cancer.

Methods: Two hundred and seven cases of prostate cancer from Toronto and 201 cases from Vancouver provided diet histories at diagnosis between 1989 and 1992 and were followed for survival from prostate cancer. After exclusions for various reasons, 263 cases (135 from Toronto, 128 from Vancouver) were analyzed in Cox proportional hazards models.

Results: Following adjustments for clinical stage, histologic grade, and other factors, significantly lower risks of dying from prostate cancer in the highest compared with the lowest tertiles of monounsaturated fat intakes were observed in each city and in the combined city analyses (combined cities: hazard ratio [HR] = 0.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.1–0.7). Survival from prostate cancer was significantly better for cases in the highest tertile of energy intake in Toronto (HR = 0.1; CI = 0.01–0.6) in contrast to that in Vancouver where these cases did relatively worse (HR = 2.6; CI = 0.6–10.7). Other nutrients were either not consistently or not significantly associated with prostate cancer survival in the two cities.

Conclusions: This bi-center cohort study observed a consistent and significant inverse association between the premorbid intake of monounsaturated fat and risk of death from prostate cancer. The inconsistent results for energy intake between cities could potentially be attributed to non-respondent bias in Toronto.

diet monounsaturated fatty acids prostate cancer survival 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Richard P. Gallagher
    • 3
  • T. Gregory Hislop
    • 3
  • Eric J. Holowaty
    • 4
  • Geoffrey R. Howe
    • 5
  • Meera Jain
    • 1
  • John R. McLaughlin
    • 6
  • Chong-Ze Teh
    • 7
  • Thomas E. Rohan
    • 8
  1. 1.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health SciencesUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Community Medicine Residency ProgramUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Cancer Control Research ProgramBritish Columbia Cancer AgencyVancouverCanada
  4. 4.Division of Preventive OncologyCancer Care OntarioTorontoCanada
  5. 5.Joseph Mailman School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Samuel Lunenfeld Research InstituteMount Sinai HospitalTorontoCanada
  7. 7.Cancer Control Research ProgramBritish Columbia Cancer AgencyVancouverCanada
  8. 8.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health SciencesUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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