Biodiversity & Conservation

, Volume 7, Issue 7, pp 869–873

Highly skewed sex ratios in the critically endangered Taita thrush as revealed by CHD genes

Authors

  • L. Lens
    • Department of OrnithologyNational Museums of Kenya
  • P. Galbusera
    • Department of BiologyUniversity of Antwerp
  • T. Brooks
    • Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of Tennessee
    • Department of OrnithologyNational Museums of Kenya
  • E. Waiyaki
    • Department of OrnithologyNational Museums of Kenya
  • T. Schenck
    • Department of BiologyUniversity of Antwerp
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1008815606931

Cite this article as:
Lens, L., Galbusera, P., Brooks, T. et al. Biodiversity and Conservation (1998) 7: 869. doi:10.1023/A:1008815606931

Abstract

The study of sex-ratio patterns in threatened bird species has yielded crucial information with regard to their conservation and management. In the case of sexually monomorphic species, i.e. species that cannot be sexed by their appearance, DNA-based sexing techniques are increasingly applied. We present data on the sexing of adult Taita thrushes, a critically endangered forest endemic from south-east Kenya. In addition to describing a morphometric trait that can be used to sex individuals directly upon capture, we comment on a remarkable skew in sex ratio that might have important consequences for the long-term survival of the species.

Taita thrushTurdus hellerisex ratioCHD-W genesconservation genetics

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998