Small Business Economics

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 1–10

Testing the Female Underperformance Hypothesis

Authors

  • Anita Du Rietz
    • Department of EconomicsStockholm School of Economics
  • Magnus Henrekson
    • Department of EconomicsStockholm School of Economics
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1008106215480

Cite this article as:
Du Rietz, A. & Henrekson, M. Small Business Economics (2000) 14: 1. doi:10.1023/A:1008106215480

Abstract

Most previous studies have found evidence at the aggregate level that female entrepreneurs underperform relative to their male counterparts. This study conducts a comprehensive test of this finding. The test is conducted on a large Swedish sample of 4200 entrepreneurs (405 females) with 1 to 20 employees in all sectors of the economy. Our study confirms the results of several previous studies that female entrepreneurs tend to underperform relative to men when the data is examined at the most aggregate level. At the same time our data reveals sharp structural differences between male and female entrepreneurs. In an extensive multi-variate regression with a large number of controls it turns out that female underperformance disappears for three out of four performance variables. The only exception is sales. No gender difference is found for profitability. A more detailed analysis reveals that the evidence of female underperformance is much weaker in larger firms and nonexistent in firms with only one employee. If it is true that female entrepreneurs on average have weaker preferences for sales growth, while we consistently find that they do not underperform in terms of profitability, our study provides no support for female underperformance given differences in preferences.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000