Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 269–296

Deep Ethology, Animal Rights, and the Great Ape/Animal Project: Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals

  • Marc Bekoff
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1007726525969

Cite this article as:
Bekoff, M. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics (1997) 10: 269. doi:10.1023/A:1007726525969

Abstract

In this essay I argue that the evolutionary and comparative study of nonhuman animal (hereafter animal) cognition in a wide range of taxa by cognitive ethologists can readily inform discussions about animal protection and animal rights. However, while it is clear that there is a link between animal cognitive abilities and animal pain and suffering, I agree with Jeremy Bentham who claimed long ago the real question does not deal with whether individuals can think or reason but rather with whether or not individuals can suffer. One of my major goals will be to make the case that the time has come to expand. The Great Ape Project (GAP) to The Great Ape/Animal Project (GA/AP) and to take seriously the moral status and rights of all animals by presupposing that all individuals should be admitted into the Community of Equals. I also argue that individuals count and that it is essential to avoid being speciesist cognitivists; it really doesn't matter whether ‘dogs ape’ or whether ‘apes dog’ when taking into account the worlds of different individual animals. Narrow-minded primatocentrism and speciesism must be resisted in our studies of animal cognition and animal protection and rights. Line-drawing into ‘lower’ and ‘higher’ species is a misleading speciesist practice that should be vigorously resisted because not only is line-drawing bad biology but also because it can have disastrous consequences for how animals are viewed and treated. Speciesist line-drawing also ignores within species individual differences.

Cognitive ethologyanimal cognitionThe Great Ape Project (GAP)The Great Ape/Animal Project (GA/AP)Community of Equalsspeciesismmoral individualismanimal rights

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc Bekoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental, Population, and Organismic BiologyUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA