European Journal of Epidemiology

, Volume 15, Issue 9, pp 809–814

Epidemiologic correlates with menstrual cycle length in middle aged women

Authors

  • Ikuko Kato
    • Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine and Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer CenterNew York University School of Medicine
    • Section of Cancer Prevention and Control, Feist-Weiller Cancer CenterLouisiana State University Health Science Center
  • Paolo Toniolo
    • Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine and Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer CenterNew York University School of Medicine
  • Karen L. Koenig
    • Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine and Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer CenterNew York University School of Medicine
  • Roy E. Shore
    • Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine and Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer CenterNew York University School of Medicine
  • Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
    • Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine and Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer CenterNew York University School of Medicine
  • Arslan Akhmedkhanov
    • Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine and Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer CenterNew York University School of Medicine
  • Elio Riboli
    • Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1007669430686

Cite this article as:
Kato, I., Toniolo, P., Koenig, K.L. et al. Eur J Epidemiol (1999) 15: 809. doi:10.1023/A:1007669430686

Abstract

While irregular menstruations have been associated with lower cumulative exposure to the ovarian steroids, shorter regular cycles have been postulated to increase the cumulative exposure. Epidemiological correlates with menstrual patterns were analyzed among 4900 premenopausal women aged 45 or younger from the New York University Women's Health Study. The length of regular menstrual cycles increased with increasing age at menarche, body mass index and parity, but decreased with age, nonwhite racial background and current smoking. The likelihood of irregular cycles increased with increasing age, body mass index and number of cigarettes smoked per day. With adjustment for age, body mass index and number of cigarettes smoked per day, the risk of irregular cycles was marginally positively associated with total fat intake.

Cigarette smokingMenstruationNutritionObesityRaceReproductive historySex hormones
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999