Surveys in Geophysics

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 197–212

CLIMATE HISTORY INFERRED FROM BOREHOLE TEMPERATURES, DATA FROM THE CZECH REPUBLIC

Authors

  • JAN ŠAFANDA
    • Geophysical InstituteAcademy of Science of the Czech Republic
  • VLADIMÌR ČERMÀK
    • Geophysical InstituteAcademy of Science of the Czech Republic
  • Louise Bodri
    • Geophysical Research GroupHungarian Academy of Sciences
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1006535926039

Cite this article as:
ŠAFANDA, J., ČERMÀK, V. & Bodri, L. Surveys in Geophysics (1997) 18: 197. doi:10.1023/A:1006535926039

Abstract

The knowledge of the present-day underground temperatures may be important in the assessments of the past climate change. The method of inversion of the temperature-depth records into the ground surface temperature history is briefly introduced by showing an example of synthetic data and illustrated by a review of existing results obtained from the inversion of temperature logs measured in holes in the Czech Republic. Underground temperatures observed in holes of the depth of at least 1000–1500 m seem to confirm the preinstrumental climate pattern of the past several thousand years. Most of shallower temperature records (500–800 m) revealed general warming of climate followed the Little Ice Age of the 17–18th centuries and a pronounced increase of the soil temperatures by at least 1 K since the beginning of this century.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997