Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 67, Issue 1, pp 97–108

Ice Storm Damage and Early Recovery in an Old-Growth Forest

  • Stéphanie M. Duguay
  • Ken Arii
  • Michael Hooper
  • Martin J. Lechowicz
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1006464511158

Cite this article as:
Duguay, S.M., Arii, K., Hooper, M. et al. Environ Monit Assess (2001) 67: 97. doi:10.1023/A:1006464511158
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Abstract

We quantified the damage causedby a major ice storm to individual trees in two1-ha permanent plots located at Mont St. Hilairein southwestern Québec, Canada. The storm, whichoccurred in January 1998, is the worst on recordin eastern North America; glaze ice on the orderof 80–100 mm accumulated at our study site. Allbut 3% of the trees (DBH ≥ 10 cm) lost at leastsome crown branches, and 35% lost more than halftheir crown. Damage to trees increased in the order: Tsuga canadensis, Betula alleghaniensis, Ostrya virginiana, Acer saccharum, Fagus grandifolia, Quercus rubra, Betula papyrifera, Acer rubrum, Tilia americana, and Fraxinus americana. Only 22% of the saplings and small trees (4 cm < DBH < 10 cm)escaped being broken or pinned to the ground byfalling material. Levels of damage generally weregreater in an exposed ridge top forest than in acove protected from wind. By August 1999 only53% of the trees had new shoots developing fromthe trunk or broken branches; among the moredominant canopy trees, Fagus grandifoliahad the least sprouting and Acer saccharumand Quercus rubra the most. We anticipateand will monitor both significant turnover in thetree community and some shift in composition ofthe canopy dominants.

forest disturbance ice storm monitoring northern hardwood forest old-growthforest tree damage tree recovery 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stéphanie M. Duguay
    • 1
  • Ken Arii
    • 1
  • Michael Hooper
    • 1
  • Martin J. Lechowicz
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiologyMcGill UniversityMontréalCanada
  2. 2.Department of BiologyMcGill UniversityMontréalCanada

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