Plant Molecular Biology

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 93–114

Myrosinase: gene family evolution and herbivore defense in Brassicaceae

Authors

  • Lars Rask
    • Dept. of Medical Biochemistry and MicrobiologyUppsala University
  • Erik Andréasson
    • Dept. of Plant BiologySwedish University of Agricultural Sciences
  • Barbara Ekbom
    • Dept. of EntomologySwedish University of Agricultural Sciences
  • Susanna Eriksson
    • Dept. of Plant BiologySwedish University of Agricultural Sciences
  • Bo Pontoppidan
    • Dept. of Plant BiologySwedish University of Agricultural Sciences
  • Johan Meijer
    • Dept. of Plant BiologySwedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1006380021658

Cite this article as:
Rask, L., Andréasson, E., Ekbom, B. et al. Plant Mol Biol (2000) 42: 93. doi:10.1023/A:1006380021658

Abstract

Glucosinolates are a category of secondary products present primarily in species of the order Capparales. When tissue is damaged, for example by herbivory, glucosinolates are degraded in a reaction catalyzed by thioglucosidases, denoted myrosinases, also present in these species. Thereby, toxic compounds such as nitriles, isothiocyanates, epithionitriles and thiocyanates are released. The glucosinolate-myrosinase system is generally believed to be part of the plant's defense against insects, and possibly also against pathogens. In this review, the evolution of the system and its impact on the interaction between plants and insects are discussed. Further, data suggesting additional functions in the defense against pathogens and in sulfur metabolism are reviewed.

cyanogenic glucosidesglucosinolatesmyrosinaseO-β-glucosidaseplant–insect interaction

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000