, Volume 53, Issue 3, pp 241-253

Diet and risk for breast cancer recurrence and survival

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Abstract

Dietary factors may influence the risk for breast cancer and also the prognosis following diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this study was to assess whether self-reported prediagnosis diet or other patient factors associated with breast cancer incidence were predictive of recurrence and survival. Patients (n=149) diagnosed with primary breast cancer between 1989 and 1991 were followed for five or more years. Total energy (hazard ratio (HR)=1.58, 95%, confidence interval (CI)= 1.05, 2.38) as well as total (HR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.05, 2.01), saturated (HR = 1.79,95% CI = 1.05, 3.04), and monounsaturated (HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.09,2.49) fat intakes were associated with increased risk, and energy-adjusted bread and cereal consumption (HR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.33, 0.93) with decreased risk of recurrence. Both total energy (HR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.03, 2.43) and polyunsaturated fat (HR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.09, 3.13) intakes were associated with an increased risk of death. All associations between dietary fat and recurrence and survival attenuated following energy adjustment. Oral contraceptive use (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.60), lymph node positive status (HR = 2.36, 95% CI = 1.01, 5.49), and tumor stage (HR = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.02, 4.81) were associated with increased risk of recurrence. Tumor stage (HR = 4.96, 95% CI = 1.86, 13.23), lymph node positive status (HR = 3.31, 95% CI = 1.38, 7.95, and estrogen receptor negative status (HR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.02, 5.94) were associated with increased risk, and arm muscle circumference (HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.09, 0.86) and mammographic utilization (HR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.61, 0.98) with decreased risk of death. Higher levels of energy, fat intakes, and selected patient characteristics (particularly disease stage and anthropometric indicators of adiposity) appear to increase risk of recurrence and/or shortened survival following the diagnosis of breast cancer.