Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 25, Issue 4, pp 377–395

Social Origins of Depressive Cognitions: A Longitudinal Study of Self-Perceived Competence in Children

  • David A. Cole
  • Farrah M. Jacquez
  • Tracy L. Maschman
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1005582419077

Cite this article as:
Cole, D.A., Jacquez, F.M. & Maschman, T.L. Cognitive Therapy and Research (2001) 25: 377. doi:10.1023/A:1005582419077

Abstract

As part of a 4-year longitudinal investigation, over 631 elementary school children evaluated themselves in five developmentally important domains: academic competence, social acceptance, physical appearance, behavioral conduct, and sports competence. In cross-sectional and prospective analyses, self-appraisals were significantly predicted by teachers', parents', and peers' appraisals in the same domains. The strength of this relation and the stability of self-appraisals increased over time. Longitudinal analyses also revealed that self-perceived competence was negatively related to later levels of self-reported depressive symptoms.

depressionself-conceptself-esteemcompetencechildrenself-appraisal

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Cole
    • 1
  • Farrah M. Jacquez
    • 1
  • Tracy L. Maschman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Notre DameNotre Dame