Transportation

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 341–361

Trip chaining as a barrier to the propensity to use public transport

  • David A. Hensher
  • April J. Reyes
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1005246916731

Cite this article as:
Hensher, D.A. & Reyes, A.J. Transportation (2000) 27: 341. doi:10.1023/A:1005246916731

Abstract

Trip chaining is a growing phenomenon in travel and activity behaviour. Individuals increasingly seek out opportunities to minimise the amount of travel required as part of activity fulfilment, given the competing demands on time budgets and their valuation of travel time savings. This search for ways of fulfilling (more) activities with less travel input has produced a number of responses, one of which is trip chaining. A particularly important policy implication of trip chaining is the potential barrier it creates in attracting car users to switch to public transport. This paper seeks to improve our understanding of trip chaining as a barrier to public transport use. A series of discrete choice models are estimated to identify the role that socio-economic and demographic characteristics of households have on the propensity to undertake trip chains of varying degrees of simplicity/complexity that involve use of the car or public transport with an embedded commuting or non-commuting primary purpose. Multinomial logit, nested logit and random parameter logit models are developed and contrasted to establish the gains in relaxing the strict conditions of the multinomial logit model.

discrete choice mixed logit survey data trip chain 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Hensher
    • 1
  • April J. Reyes
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Transport Studies, School of Business, Faculty of Economics and BusinessThe University of SydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Institute of Transport Studies, School of Business, Faculty of Economics and BusinessThe University of SydneyAustralia

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