Space Science Reviews

, Volume 86, Issue 1, pp 409–448

The Ultra-Low-Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ULEIS) for the ACE spacecraft

  • G.M. Mason
  • R.E. Gold
  • S.M. Krimigis
  • J.E. Mazur
  • G.B. Andrews
  • K.A. Daley
  • J.R. Dwyer
  • K.F. Heuerman
  • T.L. James
  • M.J. Kennedy
  • T. LeFevere
  • H. Malcolm
  • B. Tossman
  • P.H. Walpole
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1005079930780

Cite this article as:
Mason, G., Gold, R., Krimigis, S. et al. Space Science Reviews (1998) 86: 409. doi:10.1023/A:1005079930780

Abstract

The Ultra Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ULEIS) on the ACE spacecraft is an ultra high resolution mass spectrometer designed to measure particle composition and energy spectra of elements He-Ni with energies from ∼45 keV nucl−1 to a few MeV nucl−1. ULEIS will investigate particles accelerated in solar energetic particle events, interplanetary shocks, and at the solar wind termination shock. By determining energy spectra, mass composition, and their temporal variations in conjunction with other ACE instruments, ULEIS will greatly improve our knowledge of solar abundances, as well as other reservoirs such as the local interstellar medium. ULEIS is designed to combine the high sensitivity required to measure low particle fluxes, along with the capability to operate in the largest solar particle or interplanetary shock events. In addition to detailed information for individual ions, ULEIS features a wide range of count rates for different ions and energies that will allow accurate determination of particle fluxes and anisotropies over short (∼few minutes) time scales.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • G.M. Mason
    • 1
  • R.E. Gold
    • 2
  • S.M. Krimigis
    • 2
  • J.E. Mazur
    • 1
  • G.B. Andrews
    • 2
  • K.A. Daley
    • 1
  • J.R. Dwyer
    • 1
  • K.F. Heuerman
    • 1
  • T.L. James
    • 1
  • M.J. Kennedy
    • 2
  • T. LeFevere
    • 2
  • H. Malcolm
    • 2
  • B. Tossman
    • 2
  • P.H. Walpole
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkU.S.A.
  2. 2.Applied Physics LaboratoryJohns Hopkins University/LaurelU.S.A.