, Volume 221, Issue 2, pp 113-120

Soil types with different texture affects development of Rhizoctonia root rot of wheat seedlings

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

The effect of different soil textures, sandy (97.5% sand, 1.6% silt, 0.9% clay), loamy sand (77% sand, 11% silt, 12% clay) and a sandy clay loam (69% sand, 7% silt, 24% clay), on root rot of wheat caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn Anastomosis Group (AG) 8 was studied under glasshouse conditions. The reduction in root and shoot biomass following inoculation with AG-8 was greater in sand than in loamy sand or sandy clay loam. Dry root weight of wheat in the sand, loamy sand and sandy clay loam soils infested with AG-8 was 91%, 55% and 28% less than in control uninfested soils. There was greater moisture retention in the loamy sand and sandy clay loam soils as compared to the sand in the upper 10–20 cm. Root penetration resistance was greater in loamy sand and sandy clay loam than in sand. Root growth in the uninfested soil column was faster in the sand than in the loamy sand and sandy clay loam soils, the roots in the sandy soil being thinner than in the other two soils. Radial spread of the pathogen in these soils in seedling trays was twice as fast in the sand in comparison to the loamy sand which in turn was more than twice that in the sandy clay loam soil. There was no evidence that differences among soils in pathogenicity or soil spread of the pathogen was related to their nutrient status. This behaviour may be related to the severity of the disease in fields with sandy soils as compared to those with loam or clay soils.

This revised version was published online in June 2006 with corrections to the Cover Date.