Neurotherapeutics

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 618–626

Corticosteroids for multiple sclerosis: I. Application for treating exacerbations

  • Elliot M. Frohman
  • Anjali Shah
  • Eric Eggenberger
  • Luanne Metz
  • Robert Zivadinov
  • Olaf Stüve
Review Article

DOI: 10.1016/j.nurt.2007.07.008

Cite this article as:
Frohman, E.M., Shah, A., Eggenberger, E. et al. Neurotherapeutics (2007) 4: 618. doi:10.1016/j.nurt.2007.07.008

Summary

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder characterized by a multiphasic course of neurological exacerbations, periods of clinical remission, and, in most patients, ultimately progressive deterioration of functional capabilities. The relapsing-remitting phase of the disease involves acute interruption in neurological functioning relating to areas of inflammation in discrete central-tract systems. The treatment of MS exacerbations with anti-inflammatory agents such as corticosteroids and adrenocorticotropic hormone has represented an established practice throughout the neurology community. Although there is scientific rationale supporting application of these agents for this purpose, the broad diversity of approaches to using these drugs in clinical practice is a derivative of expert opinion and anecdotal experience. Ultimately, the treatment of MS-related exacerbations is part science, but mostly art. This review discusses the pharmacology of these agents, to better understand how they may act to mitigate attacks and to provide some practical formulations for how to use them in the clinic for the benefit of patients.

Key Words

CorticosteroidsACTHpulse steroids
Download to read the full article text

Copyright information

© Springer New York 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elliot M. Frohman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anjali Shah
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eric Eggenberger
    • 3
  • Luanne Metz
    • 4
  • Robert Zivadinov
    • 6
  • Olaf Stüve
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at DallasDallas
  2. 2.Department OphthalmologyUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at DallasDallas
  3. 3.Department of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at DallasDallas
  4. 4.Department of Neurology and OphthalmologyMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing
  5. 5.Department of Clinical NeurosciencesUniversity of Calgary and Calgary Health RegionCalgaryCanada
  6. 6.Department of Neurology, Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, The Jacobs Neurological InstituteState University of New York at BuffaloBuffalo
  7. 7.Neurology Section, Medical ServiceVeterans Affairs North Texas Health Care SystemDallas