Clinical Pharmacokinetics

, Volume 56, Issue 5, pp 449–458

Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Insulin Glargine 300 U/mL

  • Jennifer N. Clements
  • Tiffaney Threatt
  • Eileen Ward
  • Kayce M. Shealy
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s40262-016-0464-6

Cite this article as:
Clements, J.N., Threatt, T., Ward, E. et al. Clin Pharmacokinet (2017) 56: 449. doi:10.1007/s40262-016-0464-6

Abstract

Concentrated insulin analogs have recently been approved and are available for clinical use in the management of diabetes mellitus. One new product is insulin glargine U-300 (Sanofi), a basal concentrated insulin of 300 U/mL. Several studies have been conducted and completed evaluating blood samples for the pharmacokinetics of insulin glargine U-300 and euglycemic clamp procedures for the pharmacodynamics. This concentrated insulin has a low within-day variability and high day-to-day reproducibility, allowing for a more constant and prolonged duration of action, compared with insulin glargine U-100 (100 U/mL). Insulin glargine U-300 is equally effective, when compared with insulin glargine U-100 for glycemic control in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin glargine U-300 has a similar efficacy profile to insulin glargine U-100 for glycemic control, yet with lower rates of nocturnal and severe hypoglycemia. Insulin glargine U-300 can be considered an acceptable basal insulin for patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, and it has a potential role among patients who are naïve to insulin therapy or require titration of basal insulin. Titration of insulin glargine U-300 would result in less volume and a lower risk of hypoglycemia, compared with insulin glargine U-100. This article evaluates and summarizes the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin glargine U-300, for patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, and summarizes its application to clinical practice.

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer N. Clements
    • 1
  • Tiffaney Threatt
    • 1
  • Eileen Ward
    • 1
  • Kayce M. Shealy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacy PracticePresbyterian College School of PharmacyClintonUSA

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